NEO-EXPRESSIONISM

January 15, 2009 at 3:58 pm (Uncategorized)

31-strato4-450

'Untitled (Abstract Red Transparent Picture with Arrow Pointing Upward),' 1990, by Sigmar Polke . This painting is highly expressive and abstract although I can definatley see architecture and some structure to it, Polke being a friend of Gerhard Richter it is clear they influenced each other. These bright colours, thick brush strokes and general emotive moody atmosphere are all qualities of Neo-Expressionism.

Neo-Expressionism emerged in the late 1970’s as a reaction against or a direct result of dissatisfaction with Minimalism, Conceptual Art and the International Style. The often ‘cold’ or analytical approach of these movements, along with their preference for pure abstract art convinced many artists to act adversely as an act of defiance. And so the so-called ‘dead art’ of painting was re-born, Neo-Expressionists embracing many elements of historical movements such as Expressionism, Post Impressionism, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art and the paintings of Pablo Picasso. To create emotional, sexually charged work, vibrant with colour, often violent brush strokes, symbolism, and narrative and often autobiographical, reflecting the artists memory. contrasting with the morals of Dadaism, the early 80’s new aggressive methods of media promotion, salesmanship and heavy marketing through dealers and galleries saw the rise of Neo-Expressionism, this was controversial as many critics were angered at its over marketing to the art buying world.

Heavily contrasting with the morals of Dadaism, the early 80’s new aggressive methods of media promotion, salesmanship and heavy marketing through dealers and galleries saw the rise of Neo-Expressionism, this was controversial as many critics were angered at its over marketing to the art buying world.

Key Artists

 

Anselm Kiefer

such as straw and oil paint in this highly emotive piece. Here kiefer digs up the past and addresses taboo and controversial issues from history by bringing up the Nazi regime, inspired by Paul Celan’s well-known poem Todesfuge (Death Fugue).

such as straw and oil paint in this highly emotive piece. Here kiefer digs up the past and addresses taboo and controversial issues from history by bringing up the Nazi regime, inspired by Paul Celan’s well-known poem Todesfuge (Death Fugue).

Eric Fischl is an American painter, his style very much reflective of U.S society, Fischl paints disturbing soft porn, drama like interpretations of white suburban America, which questions conformity as well as bringing to light the dangers of closed mindedness.

Fischl is most famed for his oil or watercolour paintings, and his style is expressive with bright bold colours and a high level of sexual content.

 

'Bad Boy' by eric Fischl 1981. Here the subject matter is very much disturbing and vulgar as is fischl's style. The colours used are rather sickly and the whole scenario is a little disturbing.

'Bad Boy' by eric Fischl 1981. Here the subject matter is very much disturbing and vulgar as is fischl's style. The colours used are rather sickly and the whole scenario is a little disturbing.

David Salle is an American painter, as well as being a sculptor, photographer, stage designer and director he is a leading contemporary figurative artist. His paintings consist of an assortment of what appear to be randomly overlapped or placed images with very rough and choppy painterly skills laid out on large canvases. Often referred to as post modernism, in the 1980’s Salle’s reputation reached its peak, and he is still successful today.

'Angels in the Rain' 1998 by David Salle. In this painting you can see the different scenes or images placed next to each other in what appears to be quite an unpremeditated way. The bright colours and thick bold brushstrokes are very expressionist in style, Salle also appears to have been influenced by the Surrealsi
‘Angels in the Rain’ 1998 by David Salle. In this painting you can see the different scenes or images placed next to each other in what appears to be quite an unpremeditated way. The bright colours and thick bold brushstrokes are very expressionist in style, Salle also appears to have been partially influenced by the Surrealist style, as the subject of a lot of his paintings is a little strange.

Sigmar Polke is a German painter and photographer who founded “Kapitalistischen Realismus” (Capitalistic Realism), a painting movement with Gerhard Richter and Konrad Lueg but is also closely assosiated with Neo-Expressionism

 

 

"Treehouse' 1976 by Sigmar Polke. Polke has used really bright emotive colour to describe this angry sky. Pouring the paint and leaving the treehouse as a dark silhouette, and breaking up the sky with different colours, really adds to the drama and worry sensed.

"Treehouse' 1976 by Sigmar Polke. Polke has used really bright emotive colour to describe this angry sky. Pouring the paint and leaving the treehouse as a dark silhouette, and breaking up the sky with different colours, really adds to the drama and worry sensed.

 

 

 

Georg Baselitz 

In the 1970s, Baselitz was part of a group of Neo-Expressionist German artists, occasionally identified as “Neue Wilden,” focusing on deformation, the power of subject and the vibrancy of the colors. He became famous for his upside-down images, he is seen as a revolutionary painter as he draws the viewer’s attention to his works by making them think and sparking their interest. The subjects of the paintings don’t seem to be as important as the visual thought behind it.

Throughout his career, Baselitz has varied his style, ranging from layering substances to his style, since the 1990s, which focuses more on lucidity and smooth changes.                                                                                                                                     baselitz_lrg

Here is an example of such an 'upside down' painting, savage brushstrokes, intense colour and anger pour through the canvas. This piece is a perfect example of the Neo-Expressionist style.

 

Here are some examples of Georg Baselitz’s expressive ‘upside down’ paintings. Bold colours, charcoal, thick brushstrokes and a very passionate style make these paintings very effective. The nudes both sitting gazing sadly into the distance adds to the emotion, which is amplified by the savage brushstrokes and colour.

Advertisements

1 Comment

  1. gordondouglas said,

    well that was quite interesting.
    I really don’t like that Baselitz guy but, he annoys me how he turns paintings upside down.
    Hope you’re having a good non teaching week
    xxxx

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: